Deep Web

Underground platforms are part of a mature ecosystem for trading cybercrime goods and services. How does a capable hosting infrastructure allow illicit activities to thrive?
The provision of services, as well as the way criminals operate in the underground, have gone through many changes over the years to cater to the market’s different infrastructure demands.
Given the increasing use by enterprises of contactless security solutions, the security of the devices that themselves are meant to control access to premises should be of prime consideration.
Criminal sellers are peddling ready-to-use ATM malware in underground markets for hacking into banks. In this report, we discuss how criminals advertise and even provide instructions on how to pull off a digital heist.
Understanding current and future threats to the internet of things (IoT) can help shape how we secure this technology that is increasingly becoming integral to today's world. What insights can be reaped from the cybercrime underground?
Bulletproof hosting (BPH) services have long been crucial parts of the cybercriminal infrastructure. How do they protect malicious activities, and how do cybercriminals use them to stay in business?
This research paper provides a closer look into China’s bustling cybercriminal underground—including new market offerings like leaked data search engines and carding devices.
A look into the North American underground reveals a more "open" community that encourages cybercriminal activity with easily accessible sites and convenient marketplaces.
While considered new and relatively smaller than its foreign counterparts, the German underground is a fully developed, well-managed haven that gives cybercriminals just about everything they need to start their own cybercrime business
Trend Micro's latest visit to the Brazilian cybercriminal underground reveals its latest trends and available services, from online banking malware to tutorial classes for new cybercriminals.
This interactive map shows how diverse the cybercriminal underground economy is, with different markets that are as unique as the country or region that it caters to.
Details of the different regional underground scenes we visited in 2015. Find out why we say the cybercriminal underground is not a huge global conglomerate, but rather a wide-ranging cluster of specialized “branches” that cater to specific needs.
An interactive map that shows how each cybercriminal underground scene in each region differ from another: from accessibility, to identity, and product service offerings.
This research into the French underground offers a look into a small market that, unlike the North American underground, is well-hidden in the Dark Web.
In 2012, we predicted that we would soon see an African underground market take root. Our recent joint research effort with the INTERPOL on the West African threat landscape may just be even greater proof of that.
We take a closer look at an emerging underground market that is driven by malicious actors who sell access to a gargantuan amount of stolen data, frequently advertised in the underground as “cloud of logs."