• This malware guises as an Opera update. Cybercriminals behind this threat stole an outdated Opera digital certificate, which they used to sign this malware.
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  • It drops a distributed denial of service (DDoS) component that targets primary and secondary DNS name servers of record for multiple South Korean government sites.To get a one-glance comprehensive view of the behavior of this Trojan, refer to the Threat Diagram shown below.
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  • This malware is related to the security incident that affected certain government and news websites in South Korea. Cybercriminals compromised the auto-update mechanism of a file-sharing software in order to serve a modified malicious version of the said software's installer.
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  • This Android malware installs itself as an administrator and uses a vulnerability found in Android. To get a one-glance comprehensive view of the behavior of this Backdoor, refer to the Threat Diagram shown below.
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  • This Android malware leads users to a fake adult dating website. Once users click on the websites' links, which purportedly lead to dating profiles and contact details, they are instead given fraudulent information.
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  • This malware uses DLL preloading, a technique more known to be utilized by PlugX.To get a one-glance comprehensive view of the behavior of this Backdoor, refer to the Threat Diagram shown below.
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  • This is the detection for exploit codes that takes advantage of a vulnerability in the hosting control panel Plesk.To get a one-glance comprehensive view of the behavior of this Trojan, refer to the Threat Diagram shown below.
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  • This is involved in an exploit attack targeting a critical vulnerability of Ruby on Rails. It connects to an IRC server where it can receive and perform commands from remote malicious attackers, as well as make the affected system part of its botnet.
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  • Spammers take advantage of the news regarding the supposedly merging of Skype, Hotmail, and MSN to lure users into downloading this malware. The spammed message includes a URL that points to this malware posing as an authorized certificate.
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  • This malware propagates by creating copies of itself in password-protected archives. It also downloads other malware onto the systems it infects, causing malicious routines to be exhibited.
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