Spam

  • Trend Micro received a sample message that poses as a legitimate LinkedIn notification. Recipients may be fooled as the email looks legitimate and the visible links in the message body looks similar to those used by LinkedIn.
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  • Holiday-themed threats are a staple in today's threat landscape. In particular, users should be on the lookout for spammed messages that leverage popular events.
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  • Another Philippine-based bank is being used in a phishing attack that was seen by Trend Micro researchers. The email message asks recipients to check their Philippine National Bank (PNB) online banking accounts for suspicious activity.
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  • Trend Micro researchers recently received a mail notification that advertises the new Mozilla Firefox 8.0, purportedly from Mozilla Firefox.
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  • Trend Micro researchers received an email that poses as a legitimate email notification from the Philippine-based bank Rizal Commercial Banking Corporation (RCBC). The email message informs recipients that RCBC disabled his/her account for security reasons.
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  • With the 2011 holidays just around the corner, holiday-themed spammed messages are also beginning to appear. Trend Micro researchers found a spammed message that claims to come from Santa Claus.
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  • A spammed message purporting to come from Starbucks is making its rounds on the Web. It informs the recipients that Starbucks is supposedly giving out gift cards via a link in the email message.
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  • Spammers are still using celebrities' names and events to get users to click malicious links. This spammed message claims to have photos of actress Lindsay Lohan undressing inside a jail.
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  • Scammers are now using a new tactic to victimize users: putting a message in the Subject field of the spammed messages. These spammed messages claim to come from FBI agents or from Angela and Dave Dawes, Britain’s third biggest lottery jackpot winners last October.
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  • TrendLabs received spammed messages that use the names of high-profile personalities such as Helena Wong (seen above), Susan Canon, and Conan Boyle, among others, to trick users into opening an .HTML file attachment.
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