JUNE 20, 2014
Your regular source of security updates from TrendLabsSM
In This Issue

Security Spotlight
Privacy and the Right to Be Forgotten

Security for Home Users
The Race to Security Is On

Security for Business
Help Out in the Fight Against Targeted Attacks



Security Spotlight

Privacy and the Right to Be Forgotten

Everything’s shared and exposed in cyberspace, bringing to light the question ‘Does freedom of expression and free press outweigh one’s right to privacy?’”



The Court of Justice of the European Union (EU)’s ruling, which upheld Mario Costeja González’s “right to be forgotten” dramatically changed what kind of data could be kept in the cloud.

In an age where data is easy to obtain and access, practically today’s currency, do we still have a say on what others know about us? Do you even know that you’re being profiled via the data that marketers collect on you?

Left to Rights

The right to privacy allows everyone to keep personal things that can be exploited away from public attention. Everyone knows this. Ironically, though, some indiscriminately share information online under the pretext of “right to free expression,” “right to free press,” “right to information,” or whatever other “right.” Some, on the other hand, share far too much about themselves because they don’t know any better. As social beings, we all love to communicate, hence the success of social networking sites. Everything’s shared and exposed in cyberspace, bringing to light the question “Does freedom of expression and free press outweigh one’s right to privacy?” With all the digital gadgets with built-in cameras out there and our insatiable thirst to share what’s hot, is anything really still private?

Forget the Unforgettable

Cyberspace is an infinite library of people and events. Unlike physical libraries though, digging up information about anyone or anything online only takes a few clicks. Information easily ends up on the Web and can be easily retrieved at any given time. Anything personal that’s kept in the cloud, no matter how dated, can remain controversial to some degree years later and have a huge impact on someone who’s starting anew. We should all be able to forget the past online, the same way we do offline.

Censorship

Differing opinions have been voiced regarding the EU’s ruling on the right to be forgotten. Some believe it curtails media freedom; some think it’s the right thing to do. This could be largely attributed to the great cultural divide between Europe and the United States. Europeans believe we should all have at least some degree of control over what’s made available about us online. Americans, meanwhile, put a premium on the freedom of speech and press. Whatever we believe, the ruling has one goal—data protection.

If you want to protect your data online, think long term. Think repercussions. Think consequences. As Trend Micro CTO Raimund Genes said, we control what makes it up to and stays in the cloud. The EU ruling on the right to be forgotten just gave us an additional layer of protection from things or events that we just want to forget.

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